DIS-TRAN Steel Blog

3 Transmission Structures Broken Down

Posted by Wendy Gintz on Jul 7, 2015 10:45:00 AM

When designing transmission structures...

it’s not as simple as saying “ok, I want self-supporting tangent mono poles with delta configuration for my entire 80 mile stretch.”  While that idea might be more economical than having h-frame or 3-pole structures, it’s just not practical.

Ultimately, the wire configurations determine which type of structure will be used, and typically there will be a mix of these structures in order to follow the right-of-way through small or tight turns. Right-of-ways go alongside or through interstates, highways, fields, woods and even water, so an engineer must keep all these situations in mind when designing.

Three common transmission structures:

  •  Tangent
    • Used when transmission route is straight
    • Generally, no longitudinal loads on the structure
  • Angle
    • Used when transmission route changes direction
    • Used from anywhere less than a 5 degree angle to a 90 degree angle
  • Dead-End
    • As name applies, dead-ends are designed to take the full component of every wire's tension
    • Does not necessarily mean end of transmission line 

                              

tangent_info_graoh_ANGLE_INFORGROAH

 

 

 

 

 

dead-end_infogrpah_pic

 

Whether the structures are tangent, angle or dead-end, wire phases can run in multiple configurations.  Horizontal Configurations provide the lowest profile. Vertical Configurations require the minimum width right-of-way. And Delta Configurations is an attempt to use the value of both horizontal and vertical configurations to maintain phase clearances.

Transmission structures can be classified as either self-supporting or guyed.

Self-Supporting Structures do not use guys: meaning they are not tied to the ground or any other structure in a way that offers additional support. They are better for restrictions to right-of-ways and tend to have loads small enough to not warrant guys.

Guying of structures is used to support the structure and allow for a more economical design in both the steel structure and foundation. Guying reduces bending and deflection. However, the downside is that it requires more right-of-way. 

*Here are some main contributing factors to keep in mind when deciding on whether or not to guy a structure:

  • Structural loading
  • Right-of-way requirements
  • Aesthetic design criteria

**Here are some other contributing factors you may want to consider:

  • Line voltage
  • Electric air gap clearance requirements
  • Ground clearance requirequirements
  • Insulation requirements
  • Number of circuits to be supported
  • Electric and magnetic field limits

There is so much to learn about Transmission Structures.  What questions do you have?  We would love to hear from you so please leave a comment below.

Check out our newest resource for Anchored Transmission Structures.  Click below.
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Tags: transmission structures, guyed structures, tangent, dead-end h-frame structures, configurations

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