DIS-TRAN Steel Blog

WOOD IS A SOLID CHOICE

Posted by Melissa Hines on Jul 18, 2016 11:32:11 AM

A majority of the 54 million crossarms, which sit at the top of 60 million utility poles in the U.S. are made of wood. Wooden crossarms have been around for decades. Most utilities and lineman are very familiar with it and know how to properly use and handle the product.Since 1965, DIS-TRAN Overhead Solutions has been the premier supplier of these wood distribution crossarms, pleasing clients with our manufacturing and treating processes. We’re proud to supply the utility industry with our superior products. 

Wood crossarms have a number of benefits, which has made them the most popular choice of the utility industry. Wood is reliable, cost-effective, and has shorter lead times than other materials, which is great for tight construction schedules or emergencies. Wood is also flexible and can be easily modified in the field. DIS-TRAN has pioneered new techniques to make our wood products even more reliable. Our Pentachlorophenol wood treatment solutions are the best in the business and ensure the longevity of your crossarms. Plus, our complete line of Douglas Fir and Southern Yellow Pine distribution crossarms always meet the latest industry specifications – whether ANSI, Edison Electric Institute, USDA-RUS, or your own requirements.Wood_Distribution.jpg

Our commitment to product innovation has helped us maintain our leading position in the crossarm industry. In 2008, we expanded our product line to offer wood transmission assemblies for H-Frame structures, along with the associated hardware. In 2010, DIS-TRAN introduced the DURA-ARM, a crossarm with factory installed galvanized steel end plates that improve the strength of the arm for longitudinal and transverse loading. These plates also eliminate end splits that may develop as the crossarm ages. The result is a longer life expectancy for the crossarm and long-term cost savings for you. Our commitment to innovation is what has allowed us to outshine the competition with products that have shorter lead times, extended life expectancies and greater value.

DIS-TRAN is proud to have been providing wood distribution crossarms to the utility industry for over 50 years, using state of the art machinery and best practice processes. We manufacture all of our materials through our facilities with a focus on safety, quality, and being the best in the industry. As Seth Godin said, “Don’t find customers for your products, find products for your customers.” Our customers continue to love and trust our tested and true wood product line, and we continue to construct and innovate our wood crossarms. If you’re interested in learning more about DIS-TRAN Overhead Solutions, visit us online at distranoverheadsolutions.com.

 

 Wood Transmission Catalog

Tags: wood transmission assemblies, crossarms, transmission, penta, wood crossarm

7 Obvious Reasons to Use Wood Distribution and Transmission Structures

Posted by Brooke Barone on Aug 27, 2014 12:17:47 PM

While many say “Out with the old and in with the new,” this might be true for hairstyles, tube socks or shag carpet, but with over 130 million wood utility structures across America that are still in service today, this is simply not the case.

Wood utility structures have an undeniable reputation for being reliable, versatile and cost-effective.Wood distribution and transmission structures remain highly preferred in the utility industry due to their ease of construction, climbability and design flexibility.

Wood Transmission Structures

Reliability Wood transmission structures have higher Basic Insulating Levels (BIL), which can help reduce lightning flashovers, cutting down on power outages.

Cost-effective With economical initial costs and low overall life cycle costs, wood can directly reduce the impact of operating expenses.

Safety Since wood transmission structures have been around for decades, utilities and lineman are very familiar with proper use and handling of the products.

Why use wood transmission structures?

  1. Lower cost
  2. Long and proven service life
  3. Adaptable to many different applications
  4. Easy to handle and store the structures
  5. Natural flexibility providing  high performance under load
  6. Can be easily modified in the field
  7. Can be supplied quickly in times of crisis

trans pic green

The general standards that wood transmission structures must meet include ANSI, RUS, NESC, WCLIB and AWPA. And just like steel, concrete and other materials, there are countless configurations for wood transmission structures. 

Just to name a few, there are:

  • Single Pole with Traditional Crossarms
  • Wishbone Structures
  • Two Pole H-Frame Structures
  • Multi-Pole H-Frame Structures

trans 2 green

When considering which manufacturer to choose, you might want to consider their history in the supply of products in the utility market, the location and number of facilities, in-house design capacity, access to raw materials and available inventory for standard items, especially when time is critical. All of these factors could make or break your recovery response when natural disasters strike.

Dive Deeper Into the Transmission World

 

Tags: utility industry, wood distribution crossarms, wood crossarms, utilities, transmission, wood crossarm, wood transmission structures, wishbone structures, H-Frame structures, wood structures

Two ASCE Must-Have References for Transmission & Substation Design

Posted by Brooke Barone on May 29, 2013 5:28:00 PM

Whether you’re a seasoned Engineer or still working on your P.E., there are a few ASCE must-haves when it comes to designing substations and transmission structures.

The first reference, Substation Structure Design Guide, also referred to as ASCE Manual 113, was first published in 2008 and is the first of its kind for substation design. The second must-have is the Design of Steel Transmission Pole Structures, also known as ASCE Standard 48-11.

Now let’s see how good you are…

Do you know the main difference in the two? (Besides the obvious that one is intended for substation design and the other for transmission pole.)

Well, if you said one is a guide and the other is a standard then you are correct! It should be addressed that while guides, standards and codes are all used, there is a difference between them.

ASCE

There is a level of importance that falls with these, meaning that if a guide contradicts a standard, the standard typically wins, and if a standard contradicts a code, the code typically wins.

The substation design guide is currently being updated along with a handful of other design guides, standards and codes.  Jennifer Gemar, Vice President of the Engineering Department at DIS-TRAN Steel, is on the ASCE 113 Design Committee which is responsible for revising the guide, and has a few updates from the latest meeting that was held in the Houston area last month. 

The plan is to have the revision ready for submittal to ASCE by late 2015.  Since this is the guide’s first time going through a revision, it will remain a design guide with the thoughts that it will eventually become a design standard through enough revisions and time.  Overall, it seems the guide has been well received throughout the industry, especially being the first time published.  It has quickly become a “go-to” book, and a great reference and training tool for newer engineers.  It’s pretty much straight forward, and has general definitions of equipment and types of structures found inside a substation.  The fundamentals are basic, and while it points in the right direction when designing, it doesn’t actually give the formulas to design the steel structures.

 The second book, ASCE Standard 48-11, was published in 2012 as a revision to the ASCE Standard 48-05, that was first published in 2005.  This standard replaced the ASCE Manual 72, which at the time, was the main design reference for transmission pole structures.  The standard outlines the minimum criteria that must be considered in the structural design, fabrication, testing, assembly and erection of these type structures.  Unlike the substation guide, ASCE 48-11 explains how to design steel poles and their corresponding connections.  There is a committee currently updating this standard as well.

It’s important that these references stay updated as knowledge and experience permits.  It’s also beneficial to be active on one of the committees responsible for these updates.  Though it can be hard work, it can also be a very educational with opportunities to contribute and shed light on problems or issues that need addressing.

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Tags: steel structures, DIS-TRAN Steel, transmission, asce manual, asce 113, pole structures, substation design, asce standards, asce, high voltage substation structure design

Wood Structures: Still in the Game or Ancient History?

Posted by Brooke Barone on Jan 18, 2013 3:04:00 PM

While many say “Out with the old and in with the new,” this might be true for hairstyles, tube socks or shag carpet, but with over 130 million wood utility structures across America that are still in service today, this is simply not the case.

Wood utility structures have an undeniable reputation for being reliable, versatile and cost-effective.Wood distribution and transmission structures remain highly preferred in the utility industry due to their ease of construction, climbability and design flexibility.

Wood Transmission Structures

Reliability Wood transmission structures have higher Basic Insulating Levels (BIL), which can help reduce lightning flashovers, cutting down on power outages.

Cost-effective With economical initial costs and low overall life cycle costs, wood can directly reduce the impact of operating expenses.

Safety Since wood transmission structures have been around for decades, utilities and lineman are very familiar with proper use and handling of the products.

Why use wood transmission structures?

  1. Lower cost
  2. Long and proven service life
  3. Adaptable to many different applications
  4. Easy to handle and store the structures
  5. Natural flexibility providing  high performance under load
  6. Can be easily modified in the field
  7. Can be supplied quickly in times of crisis

trans pic green

The general standards that wood transmission structures must meet include ANSI, RUS, NESC, WCLIB and AWPA. And just like steel, concrete and other materials, there are countless configurations for wood transmission structures. 

Just to name a few, there are:

  • Single Pole with Traditional Crossarms
  • Wishbone Structures
  • Two Pole H-Frame Structures
  • Multi-Pole H-Frame Structures

trans 2 green

When considering which manufacturer to choose, you might want to consider their history in the supply of products in the utility market, the location and number of facilities, in-house design capacity, access to raw materials and available inventory for standard items, especially when time is critical. All of these factors could make or break your recovery response when natural disasters strike.

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Tags: utility industry, wood distribution crossarms, wood crossarms, utilities, transmission, wood crossarm, wood transmission structures, wishbone structures, H-Frame structures, wood structures

DIS-TRAN's Top Utility Posts of 2012

Posted by Brooke Barone on Jan 4, 2013 10:50:00 AM

As the new calendar year begins, it’s a good time to look back at all the accomplishments, as well as all the areas of improvement, to ensure that the next 365 days are just as good, if not better, than the previous.

One accomplishment from 2012 would have to be the continuous success of the DIS-TRAN Blog.

For me, the best part about writing each blog is that, as I’m sharing valuable information with others, I’m also learning too. And I couldn’t have done it without the participation and help from all of the employees here who have taught me so much.

So with that said, here’s a recap of some of the 2012 blog articles that seemed to make the biggest impact among our readers.

Top Posts by Page Views:

1. 10 Things You Ought to Know about TimberSIL Distribution Crossarms- Coming in at number one for 2012, this article generated the most interest and moved the conversation about this new “green” product.

2. The Secret to Building Morale by Maintaining Your Plant- This post shows a few simple steps that could change the entire perception of your fabricating facility!.

3. A Cheat Sheet for Electrical Substations- An inside look at how electricity is generated from substations into your home, and the main structures found inside a substation and their functions.

Top Human Interest Posts:

1. Road to Recovery After Hurricane Sandy- Super Storm Sandy left thousands of homes flooded and millions in the dark. Although DIS-TRAN wasn’t physically there, we worked around the clock to assist utilities to get power restored as quickly as possible. Our hearts go out to everyone who encountered Sandy’s devastation.

2. DIS-TRAN Goes Pink- This was an awesome experience and I’m really glad I got to do it with some great people!

3. DIS-TRAN’s Quick Response for Storm Restoration- Real time efforts made by DIS-TRAN and the dedicated employees who make this happen.

Top Informational Posts:

1. Design Practice for Flange Plates versus Slip Joint Connections- Great advice with a little help from our engineering department.

2. How to Use Lean Manufacturing to Increase Production- Lean Manufacturing might be an easy concept to understand, but implementing it takes hard work, persistence and teamwork.

3. Back to Basics in Transmission Structures- For anyone just starting off in this industry, substations and transmissions can get confusing. This article walks through transmission structures and their different configurations at an easy-to-learn pace.

Since September, just within a matter of a few months, our blog has taken off and I’d like to thank all of our subscribers and followers for reading and sharing our posts. If there’s anything you’d like us to write about, share or answer, please leave a comment below and we will do our best to help!

Happy New Year!

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Tags: substations, utilities, transmission, transmission structures, DIS-TRAN, TimberSIL, utility, distribution corssarms, storm restoration, flange plates, electrical substations, joint connections

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